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Questões Exército - 2018 - EsPCEx - Cadete do Exército - 2° Dia

Foram encontradas 56 questões

Q937969 Inglês
Leia o texto a seguir e responda à questão.

The photography exercise book by Bert Krages Training your eye to shoot like a pro

    A while ago I was asked if I’d like to have a look at Bert Krages’ book. My initial thought was that it would pretty much be a list of ‘try this’ exercises. Well in a way it is, in that you really need to go out and try the exercises, not just read about them. In much the same way that my piano playing won’t improve by just buying more books about playing the piano…
    Try the technical exercises – a desk lamp and an egg really can teach you an enormous amount about the realities of lighting, shadows and reflected light. I’ve been a pro photographer since 2004 and taking the time to do some of the exercises has been of real benefit.
    A well-written book that is packed with useful images to illustrate the matters at hand. It’s nice to see the author didn’t fall into the trap of only including ‘perfect’ photos – you will look at some and think ‘I could do better than that’ – good!
    It’s a book for people who want to take more photos and increase their satisfaction from doing so. Definitely one to try if you feel you’re perhaps clinging to some of the technical aspects of photography as a bit of a safety blanket, to avoid the fluffy artsy stuff.
    Book Author Info.
    Bert Krages is a photographer and attorney who is the author of two previous photography books, Legal Handbook for Photographers and Heavenly Bodies: The Photographer’s Guide to Astrophotography.

 Adapted from http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/
In the sentence “... the author didn’t fall into the trap of only including ‘perfect’ photos...” (paragraph 3), the expression fall into the trap means
Você errou!   Resposta: Parabéns! Você acertou!
Q937968 Inglês
Leia o texto a seguir e responda à questão.

The photography exercise book by Bert Krages Training your eye to shoot like a pro

    A while ago I was asked if I’d like to have a look at Bert Krages’ book. My initial thought was that it would pretty much be a list of ‘try this’ exercises. Well in a way it is, in that you really need to go out and try the exercises, not just read about them. In much the same way that my piano playing won’t improve by just buying more books about playing the piano…
    Try the technical exercises – a desk lamp and an egg really can teach you an enormous amount about the realities of lighting, shadows and reflected light. I’ve been a pro photographer since 2004 and taking the time to do some of the exercises has been of real benefit.
    A well-written book that is packed with useful images to illustrate the matters at hand. It’s nice to see the author didn’t fall into the trap of only including ‘perfect’ photos – you will look at some and think ‘I could do better than that’ – good!
    It’s a book for people who want to take more photos and increase their satisfaction from doing so. Definitely one to try if you feel you’re perhaps clinging to some of the technical aspects of photography as a bit of a safety blanket, to avoid the fluffy artsy stuff.
    Book Author Info.
    Bert Krages is a photographer and attorney who is the author of two previous photography books, Legal Handbook for Photographers and Heavenly Bodies: The Photographer’s Guide to Astrophotography.

 Adapted from http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/
What is the question the author refers to when he says: “...I was asked if I’d like to have a look at Bert Krages’ book.”? (paragraph 1).
Você errou!   Resposta: Parabéns! Você acertou!
Q937967 Inglês
Leia o texto a seguir e responda à questão.

The photography exercise book by Bert Krages Training your eye to shoot like a pro

    A while ago I was asked if I’d like to have a look at Bert Krages’ book. My initial thought was that it would pretty much be a list of ‘try this’ exercises. Well in a way it is, in that you really need to go out and try the exercises, not just read about them. In much the same way that my piano playing won’t improve by just buying more books about playing the piano…
    Try the technical exercises – a desk lamp and an egg really can teach you an enormous amount about the realities of lighting, shadows and reflected light. I’ve been a pro photographer since 2004 and taking the time to do some of the exercises has been of real benefit.
    A well-written book that is packed with useful images to illustrate the matters at hand. It’s nice to see the author didn’t fall into the trap of only including ‘perfect’ photos – you will look at some and think ‘I could do better than that’ – good!
    It’s a book for people who want to take more photos and increase their satisfaction from doing so. Definitely one to try if you feel you’re perhaps clinging to some of the technical aspects of photography as a bit of a safety blanket, to avoid the fluffy artsy stuff.
    Book Author Info.
    Bert Krages is a photographer and attorney who is the author of two previous photography books, Legal Handbook for Photographers and Heavenly Bodies: The Photographer’s Guide to Astrophotography.

 Adapted from http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/
What kind of text is this?
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Q937966 Inglês

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Many graduates earn ‘paltry returns’ for their degree


    Mr Halfon, a former skills minister, stated in his speech that the nation has “become obsessed ______(1) full academic degrees”.

    “We are creating a higher education system that overwhelmingly favours academic degrees, while intermediate and higher technical offerings are comparatively tiny. The labour market does not need an ever-growing supply of academic degrees. Between a fifth and a third of our graduates take non-graduate jobs. The extra return for having a degree varies wildly according to subject and institution. For many, the returns are paltry.”

    Mr Halfon said that there is a strong need for intermediate skills. “There are skills shortages in several sectors. And there are millions ______(2) people who want to get on in life – preferably without spending £50,000 on academic degrees,” he added. “There has been growing concern about the amount of debt students are accumulating and the interest being charged on that debt.”

    A spokesman for UUK (a representative organisation for the UK’s universities) said: “Official figures are clear that, on average, university graduates continue to earn substantially more than non-graduates and are more likely to be in employment. A university degree remains an excellent investment.”

    “We must, however, be careful to avoid using graduate salaries as the single measure of success in higher education. Many universities specialise in fields such ______(3) the arts, the creative industries, nursing and public sector professions that, despite making an essential contribution to society and the economy, pay less on average.”


Adapted from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-42923529

According to the text, read the statements and choose the correct alternative.
I. Fifty percent of the graduates take non-graduate jobs. II. Having a degree doesn’t necessarily mean having great salaries. III. The labour market lacks intermediate skills. IV. Many people would rather not spend £50,000 on academic degrees. V. In every single case, university graduates make more money than non-graduates.
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Q937965 Inglês

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Many graduates earn ‘paltry returns’ for their degree


    Mr Halfon, a former skills minister, stated in his speech that the nation has “become obsessed ______(1) full academic degrees”.

    “We are creating a higher education system that overwhelmingly favours academic degrees, while intermediate and higher technical offerings are comparatively tiny. The labour market does not need an ever-growing supply of academic degrees. Between a fifth and a third of our graduates take non-graduate jobs. The extra return for having a degree varies wildly according to subject and institution. For many, the returns are paltry.”

    Mr Halfon said that there is a strong need for intermediate skills. “There are skills shortages in several sectors. And there are millions ______(2) people who want to get on in life – preferably without spending £50,000 on academic degrees,” he added. “There has been growing concern about the amount of debt students are accumulating and the interest being charged on that debt.”

    A spokesman for UUK (a representative organisation for the UK’s universities) said: “Official figures are clear that, on average, university graduates continue to earn substantially more than non-graduates and are more likely to be in employment. A university degree remains an excellent investment.”

    “We must, however, be careful to avoid using graduate salaries as the single measure of success in higher education. Many universities specialise in fields such ______(3) the arts, the creative industries, nursing and public sector professions that, despite making an essential contribution to society and the economy, pay less on average.”


Adapted from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-42923529

Choose the alternative containing the correct words to respectively complete gaps (1), (2) and (3).
Você errou!   Resposta: Parabéns! Você acertou!
Respostas
1: A
2: D
3: B
4: D
5: E