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Questões de Inglês para Concurso

Foram encontradas 891 questões

Q1007840 Inglês

TEXTO IV

Use of Technology in English Language Class


Technology is an effective tool for learners. Learners must use technology as a significant part of their learning process. Teachers should model the use of technology to support the curriculum so that learners can increase the true use of technology in learning their language skills (Costley, 2014; Murphy, DePasquale, & McNamara, 2003). Learners’ cooperation can be increased through technology. Cooperation is one of the important tools for learning. Learners cooperatively work together to create tasks and learn from each other through reading their peers’ work (Keser, Huseyin, & Ozdamli, 2011).

Bennett, Culp, Honey, Tally, and Spielvogel (2000) asserted that the use of computer technology lead to the improvement of teachers’ teaching and learners’ learning in the classes. The use of computer technology helps teachers meet their learners’ educational needs. According to Bransford, Brown, and Cocking (2000), the application of computer technology enables teachers and learners to make local and global societies that connect them with the people and expand opportunities for their learning. They continued that the positive effect of computer technology does not come automatically; it depends on how teachers use it in their language classrooms.

AHMADI, M. R. The use of techonology in English language learning: a literature review. International Journal of Research in English Education. Volume 3, Number 2, June 2018


Pode-se inferir do Texto IV que:

Você errou!   Resposta: Parabéns! Você acertou!
Q1007839 Inglês

TEXTO III

Observe o cartoon abaixo para responder à questão:



A partir da leitura do Texto III, pode-se inferir que:

Você errou!   Resposta: Parabéns! Você acertou!
Q1007838 Inglês

                                               TEXTO II

                            Introduction to reading strategies


      As students progress through school, they are asked to read increasingly complex informational and graphical texts in their courses. The ability to understand and use the information in these texts is key to a student’s success in learning. Successful students have a repertoire of strategies to draw upon, and know how to use them in different contexts. Struggling students need explicit teaching of these strategies to become better readers.


      Struggling readers need:

      • knowledge of different types of texts and the best strategies for reading them.

      • multiple and meaningful opportunities to practise reading in subj ect-specific contexts.

      • opportunities to practise reading with appropriate resources.

      • opportunities to talk about their reading and thinking.

      • background knowledge in subject areas.

      • expanded sight vocabularies and word-solving strategies for reading subj ect-specific texts.

      • strategies for previewing texts, monitoring their understanding, determining the most important ideas and the relationships among them, remembering what they read, and making connections and inferences.

      • strategies for becoming independent readers in any context.


      Common Understandings About Reading

      Reading is the active process of understanding print and graphic texts. Reading is a thinking process. Effective readers know that when they read, what they read is supposed to make sense. They monitor their understanding, and when they lose the meaning of what they are reading, they often unconsciously select and use a reading strategy (such as rereading or asking questions) that will help them reconnect with the meaning of the text. Reading skills and strategies can be taught explicitly while students are learning subject-specific content through authentic reading tasks.

      Effective readers use strategies to understand what they read before, during, and after reading.

      Before reading, they:

      • use prior knowledge to think about the topic.

      • make predictions about the probable meaning of the text.

      • preview the text by skimming and scanning to get a sense of the overall meaning. 

      During reading, they:

      • monitor understanding by questioning, thinking about, and reflecting on the ideas and information in the text.

      After reading, they:

      • reflect upon the ideas and information in the text.

      • relate what they have read to their own experiences and knowledge.

      • clarify their understanding of the text.

      • extend their understanding in critical and creative ways.


Students can be taught to be strategic and effective readers. Struggling readers benefit from a variety of instructional approaches that demonstrate reading skills as subject content is taught. Direct teaching, thinking aloud, modelling, discussion, and small-group support are only a few of the approaches teachers use to help students become more strategic and effective readers in different contexts.

Think literacy: cross-curricular approaches, Grades 7-12. Disponível em: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/studentsuccess/ thinkliteracy/files/reading.pdf . Acesso em 22 de novembro de 2018.

De acordo com o Texto II, NÃO é considerada uma estratégia de leitura:
Você errou!   Resposta: Parabéns! Você acertou!
Q1007837 Inglês

                                               TEXTO II

                            Introduction to reading strategies


      As students progress through school, they are asked to read increasingly complex informational and graphical texts in their courses. The ability to understand and use the information in these texts is key to a student’s success in learning. Successful students have a repertoire of strategies to draw upon, and know how to use them in different contexts. Struggling students need explicit teaching of these strategies to become better readers.


      Struggling readers need:

      • knowledge of different types of texts and the best strategies for reading them.

      • multiple and meaningful opportunities to practise reading in subj ect-specific contexts.

      • opportunities to practise reading with appropriate resources.

      • opportunities to talk about their reading and thinking.

      • background knowledge in subject areas.

      • expanded sight vocabularies and word-solving strategies for reading subj ect-specific texts.

      • strategies for previewing texts, monitoring their understanding, determining the most important ideas and the relationships among them, remembering what they read, and making connections and inferences.

      • strategies for becoming independent readers in any context.


      Common Understandings About Reading

      Reading is the active process of understanding print and graphic texts. Reading is a thinking process. Effective readers know that when they read, what they read is supposed to make sense. They monitor their understanding, and when they lose the meaning of what they are reading, they often unconsciously select and use a reading strategy (such as rereading or asking questions) that will help them reconnect with the meaning of the text. Reading skills and strategies can be taught explicitly while students are learning subject-specific content through authentic reading tasks.

      Effective readers use strategies to understand what they read before, during, and after reading.

      Before reading, they:

      • use prior knowledge to think about the topic.

      • make predictions about the probable meaning of the text.

      • preview the text by skimming and scanning to get a sense of the overall meaning. 

      During reading, they:

      • monitor understanding by questioning, thinking about, and reflecting on the ideas and information in the text.

      After reading, they:

      • reflect upon the ideas and information in the text.

      • relate what they have read to their own experiences and knowledge.

      • clarify their understanding of the text.

      • extend their understanding in critical and creative ways.


Students can be taught to be strategic and effective readers. Struggling readers benefit from a variety of instructional approaches that demonstrate reading skills as subject content is taught. Direct teaching, thinking aloud, modelling, discussion, and small-group support are only a few of the approaches teachers use to help students become more strategic and effective readers in different contexts.

Think literacy: cross-curricular approaches, Grades 7-12. Disponível em: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/studentsuccess/ thinkliteracy/files/reading.pdf . Acesso em 22 de novembro de 2018.

Na sentença “They monitor their understanding, and when they lose the meaning of what they are reading...”, o item lexical “They” se refere a:
Você errou!   Resposta: Parabéns! Você acertou!
Q1007836 Inglês

                                               TEXTO II

                            Introduction to reading strategies


      As students progress through school, they are asked to read increasingly complex informational and graphical texts in their courses. The ability to understand and use the information in these texts is key to a student’s success in learning. Successful students have a repertoire of strategies to draw upon, and know how to use them in different contexts. Struggling students need explicit teaching of these strategies to become better readers.


      Struggling readers need:

      • knowledge of different types of texts and the best strategies for reading them.

      • multiple and meaningful opportunities to practise reading in subj ect-specific contexts.

      • opportunities to practise reading with appropriate resources.

      • opportunities to talk about their reading and thinking.

      • background knowledge in subject areas.

      • expanded sight vocabularies and word-solving strategies for reading subj ect-specific texts.

      • strategies for previewing texts, monitoring their understanding, determining the most important ideas and the relationships among them, remembering what they read, and making connections and inferences.

      • strategies for becoming independent readers in any context.


      Common Understandings About Reading

      Reading is the active process of understanding print and graphic texts. Reading is a thinking process. Effective readers know that when they read, what they read is supposed to make sense. They monitor their understanding, and when they lose the meaning of what they are reading, they often unconsciously select and use a reading strategy (such as rereading or asking questions) that will help them reconnect with the meaning of the text. Reading skills and strategies can be taught explicitly while students are learning subject-specific content through authentic reading tasks.

      Effective readers use strategies to understand what they read before, during, and after reading.

      Before reading, they:

      • use prior knowledge to think about the topic.

      • make predictions about the probable meaning of the text.

      • preview the text by skimming and scanning to get a sense of the overall meaning. 

      During reading, they:

      • monitor understanding by questioning, thinking about, and reflecting on the ideas and information in the text.

      After reading, they:

      • reflect upon the ideas and information in the text.

      • relate what they have read to their own experiences and knowledge.

      • clarify their understanding of the text.

      • extend their understanding in critical and creative ways.


Students can be taught to be strategic and effective readers. Struggling readers benefit from a variety of instructional approaches that demonstrate reading skills as subject content is taught. Direct teaching, thinking aloud, modelling, discussion, and small-group support are only a few of the approaches teachers use to help students become more strategic and effective readers in different contexts.

Think literacy: cross-curricular approaches, Grades 7-12. Disponível em: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/studentsuccess/ thinkliteracy/files/reading.pdf . Acesso em 22 de novembro de 2018.

É correto afirmar que, dentre outros tópicos, o Texto II apresenta e discute:
Você errou!   Resposta: Parabéns! Você acertou!
Respostas
1: C
2: A
3: D
4: C
5: C